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The Paper Kites with Larkin Poe

Friday, July 29, 2016

Port City Music Hall, Portland, Maine

I was so grateful for this concert experience. I received a very nice email from Larkin Poe’s publicist a few days before the show inviting me to come, and I decided to rearrange my schedule to attend. I am so glad I did. Larkin Poe had just played the Newport Folk Festival, and anyone who is invited to play there is definitely worth checking out. The Paper Kites have been popping up on my Spotify “Discover Weekly” playlists for a long while now, and I particularly like their song “Bloom.” I went to my first Muay Thai boxing class at my gym, and then showered and motored down to Portland to Port City Music Hall. After attending a show the night before at the Maine State Pier (which is such a disappointing place to “see” a show), I was so glad to be on my way to a venue I love where I knew I’d get to be up close and actually see the bands.

Larkin Poe is Rebecca and Megan Lovell, sisters from Atlanta, Georgia. They’ve both toured in Elvis Costello’s band, and they’ve got chops. They took the stage with a powerful a cappella song, and I was sold. I got there early, so was front and center, and I was mesmerized. These sisters have tons of chemistry, and I liked their lyrics, rock sensibility, and effort to connect with the crowd. Rebecca told us that their band name comes from their great-great-great-grandfather, who was a cousin of Edgar Allen Poe. I don’t know their music well, but I remember “Tornado” stuck out. They played “Trouble In Mind” on Conan O’Brien back in April. You should definitely check them out live.

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Rebecca and Megan Lovell are Larkin Poe

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During the break, I chatted with a trio of women who’d flown up from New Orleans, partially to visit a friend from Maine, but surely to coincide with seeing Australia’s Paper Kites live. They were lovely to chat with, and the crowd that night was 18+ and quite respectful and nice to be around. It’s always great when people come to a show to actually see the show, and an 18+ show often means there are fewer drunkards who detract from the overall concert experience. The “kids” in the audience were clearly fans, and they sang every word of every song.

The Paper Kites‘ front man Sam Bentley was quite chatty with the crowd, and he told us the stories behind a handful of their songs, which is something I absolutely love. He joked that “I’d like to connect with you by telling you the story of another song,” which was charming and worked beautifully. I wish more artists would tell us about their songs. Sam told us the story behind “Paint.” He was in a long distance relationship when he was young and living at home, and wanted to make a grand gesture to his girlfriend by painting a love note to her in invisible ink he’d ordered online from China on his bedroom ceiling. It turned out to not be all that invisible. His parents were mad and he had to paint over it. They also broke up. He explained the song as “dealing with a life that didn’t quite happen.” This was the last night of the Paper Kites’ tour, and I’m so glad I got to spend it with them. This fantastic show was a completely welcome nice surprise. Pictures below!

xo,

bree

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The Paper Kites

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All the way from New Orleans for this double thumbs up show!

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Joe Walsh with JD & The Straight Shot

Thursday, July 28, 2016

Maine State Pier, Portland, Maine

When I got a kind invitation from JD & The Straight Shot’s publicist to attend this show where they were opening for legendary Eagles’ guitarist Joe Walsh, I decided I shouldn’t pass up the opportunity. I had two reservations about this, though, because classic rock is not really my thing and I HATE the Maine State Pier. I think it’s easily the worst venue in Maine. I avoid shows there. My former sweetie said it well after we went to see Jonny Lang and The Kenny Wayne Shepherd Band there last summer, “maybe if I had been closer to the stage it would have been more engaging, but standing room feels essentially like you are standing outside the venue looking in.” I completely agree. Going to “see” a show at the Pier is practically guaranteed to be a disappointment. When people ask me about seeing a show at the Pier, I tell them to skip it. If they absolutely love the artist, I recommend they go see them on another stop of the tour in New Hampshire or Massachusetts. If the Pier is a must, I suggest getting reserved seat tickets as close to the stage as you can afford (tickets are usually very expensive at the Pier, no matter where you end up, though), or get there before doors open and make sure you’re in the front row along the outside third of either the right or left side of the barricade that separates GA from the reserved seats. Even if you’re in the second row of GA, you’re probably not going to be able to see a thing, and certainly not the stage. If you’re in GA, you absolutely cannot see if you’re directly behind the soundboard tent, which spans about 30% of the width of the Pier.

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I held my phone up over my head to take this picture. So, if you’re about 6’5”, this could be your view from GA at the Maine State Pier. See that ant on stage in yellow? That’s Joe Walsh. What a view!

Also, I always feel a little on edge at the Pier. There are always folks there who are shirtless and smoking cigarettes while shouting obscenities and stumbling from too much alcohol. Oh! And this show happened to be the night the Pier rolled out their new “security policy,” where no purses were allowed unless they were wristlet sized OR you waited in line to buy a clear plastic tote bag printed with the “Waterfront Concerts” logo that then you could just place your entire purse (much bigger than wristlet size) in. What is the point? It was so stupid. I am all for increased security, but do thorough bag searches—don’t just make a security policy that someone can circumvent by buying a crappy plastic bag for $5. I hate this venue. “Seeing” shows there is the worst and that means that I go there as infrequently as possible.

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Don’t you feel safer already?

I invited my friend Ian to join me, because he’d just finished taking the bar exam (no, I didn’t invite him to the Pier because I don’t like him), and we parked and got to the venue when I was told by their publicist the opening band was slated to start. I don’t know why, but JD & The Straight Shot took the stage early. By the time I got my press pass (see, I had to wait in the same line as the ladies looking to buy their “secure” $5 clear plastic bag), they were well into their set. I was there at the invitation of their publicist, so I wanted to be sure to get a nice photo of the band for them, but someone who worked for the Pier shooed me away and told me I’d missed the first three songs of their set, so I couldn’t take any pictures. I told him I’d been invited by the band and asked if I could just sit in an empty seat for one minute and take a handful of shots, but he flatly refused. I was frustrated. I emailed their publicist with the bad news and only ended up hearing a song or two. I thought the band was pretty talented, but their front man, Knicks owner James Dolan (JD), was odd. He wore a Mad Hatter hat and was awkward during his banter and then literally pulled a stuffed bunny out of it and threw it into the crowd. He reminded me of a creepy uncle that you try to avoid at Thanksgiving because everything he says and does makes people cringe. It definitely seemed like he just put some money into hiring a talented backup band so he could go on tour and be a rock star. I actually think the band could be good if they got a new lead singer, though.

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JD & The Straight Shot

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I was excited to see Joe Walsh. I watched an interview with him online, and I respect that he got clean after decades of heavy drug use. I was a little surprised to hear how great he sounded live. He’s still got it. I shot at the stage for one song before someone from the Walsh Toor (that’s what they’re calling it) let me know I needed to shoot from the sound booth. Since that is really far from the stage, I decided it wasn’t worth it, so I lingered at the side and ended up chatting with the only other photographer, who turned out to be Ben Moore from Active Beer Geek. Ian and I “watched” some of Joe’s set from general admission, but people around us were drunk and belligerent and you can’t actually see anything from GA, so we left early after hearing Joe do a cover of “Everyday People.” The backup singers were great, too!

FullSizeRender 13IMG_3859IMG_3830IMG_3862Ian and I grabbed a shared table on the deck next door at Flatbread, and enjoyed delicious cocktails (we were trying to salvage the night after an icky trip to the Pier, after all) while eavesdropping a little on the couple sitting at the other end of our table. They were definitely on a first date, and it seemed to be going really well. We thought the woman talked a little bit too much about weddings for a first date, but her date seemed into her overall and was quite attentive. We agreed they’d probably have a second date. We were far better able to hear the Joe Walsh show from Flatbread’s deck than the Pier, and heard “Take It to the Limit” (which he played in honor of his Eagles bandmate, Glenn Frey, who passed away early this year) and “Life in the Fast Lane.” We had a delicious dinner, and when a new couple sat down at the other end of our table, I jokingly asked them if they were also on their first date, and they told us they’d just gotten engaged! They were really sweet, and Ian and I were among the first to know! The second half of the night helped salvage the first, and we had fun, despite having tried and failed (again) to enjoy a show at the Maine State Pier.

xo,

bree

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The Ballroom Thieves

Tuesday, July 12, 2016

Snow Pond Center for the Arts, Sidney, Maine

I’d never been to Snow Pond Center for the Arts before, but a friend got married there, and when I saw the wedding photos afterwards, I knew I wanted to check out this beautiful amphitheatre in the woods. I love The Ballroom Thieves and have seen them live maybe ten times now. They are easily one of my top favorite bands, and I’ve said so very often and really hope they’re on your radar by now. Martin, Devin, and Callie are wonderfully talented musicians with lyrics and harmonies that hit you in the feels. I met my friend Andrea at the venue. She is a superfan by definition—gets to shows before doors open, connects with bands she loves over social media, and stays after shows to talk to bands—so we drove separately so she could do all of those things. We paid for tickets that included a delicious BBQ, which is the dinner the kids at New England Music Camp eat every night. I was over the moon when I ran into one of my incredible Mt. Ararat kiddos who was attending music camp. We got to catch up a bit and she told me later that she was really impressed with the Thieves and loved the show.

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The Ballroom Thieves took the stage and wowed the crowd. Andrea and I sat on a blanket front and center and soaked it in. It was pretty special to see the Thieves with birds singing their own songs in the trees nearby and enjoying the sky change colors over the amphitheatre. New England Music Camp musicians joined The Thieves on stage and accompanied them for a few songs (which they’d just learned that day), which rounded out the sound. I am really glad I made the trip to see one of my favorite bands in such a lovely spot! Check out “Here I Stand,” which is a favorite Thieves song of mine. Thanks, Thieves! When’s your new album debuting? I am so ready!

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I got a very nice email a couple of weeks later from Christine Durgin, the Director of Community Relations at Snow Pond Center for the Arts. She said it was great to meet me (she gave me such a warm welcome when I arrived) and reminded me I was invited to come back to take a tour. If you need to throw an event of any kind, I suspect these folks are fabulous to work with. Thanks, Christine! I’ll be back!

xo,

bree

I feel like I’ve gone on and on about the Thieves for years, so I intentionally wrote a short post here. If you are someone who likes to know more, here are links to a few older show recaps:

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John Paul White with The Secret Sisters

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

The Red Room at Café 939, Boston, MA

My friend Mac first introduced me to The Civil Wars on a cold winter’s night in 2009. John Paul White and Joy Williams were captivating. Their April 2009 set at Eddie’s Attic was recorded and released online as a free download a couple of months later on The Civil Wars’ website. The pair had undeniable musical chemistry and their songs resonated with me. I made a friend at an Iron & Wine show in 2011 who invited me to join him for Adele at the House of Blues in Boston a month later. Those tickets were impossible to get, so I was thrilled. I squealed out loud when I found out that The Civil Wars had been added to the bill and that I was going to get to finally see them live. I stayed after the show and approached John Paul White at the merch table, which is something I rarely do. I was sure he is a genuine person who would be kind (doesn’t it ruin it for you when you meet an artist whose music you care about, and they’re not?), and he was a dear. I told him that I’d been hoping to see them for a couple of years, and that I was actually more excited to see them that night. He glanced at Joy and said “don’t you think that deserves a group hug?” And then they hugged me. It was very, very sweet, and a moment I still recall fondly. I was lucky to see The Civil Wars again a handful of months later at Berklee’s Performing Arts Center in Boston from the fourth or fifth row. They were spellbinding. Then they broke up.

I was thrilled when I saw that John Paul White was writing music and was planning a tour. He produced Penny and Sparrow’s beautiful album, Let a Lover Drown You, which I’ve listened to countless times. I bought my ticket to see JPW at The Red Room at Café 939 at Berklee College of Music in Boston the minute they went on sale. I would not pass up an opportunity to see him live in such an intimate setting. My friend Jan and I drove to Boston and grabbed an early dinner at Bukowski’s and lined up before doors opened so we could be front and center, and it paid off, because we were able to stand a foot or two away from such talented musicians all night.

I’d first seen Laura and Lydia Rogers, The Secret Sisters, open for my beloved Brandi Carlile (she and the Twins are producing their upcoming album, too) about six months after first seeing The Civil Wars back in November of 2011 at Berklee in Boston. I loved their vintage vibe, beautiful harmonies, and funny audience banter. I got to see them again a couple of years later with my concert friend Bob (who’d taken me to see Adele and The Civil Wars) when they opened for Iron & Wine at State Theatre in Portland, Maine. The Secret Sisters played a half dozen songs and told stories and entertained thoroughly. I particularly liked “Carry Me,” which was such a sweet song about being daddy’s girls and having a wonderful father. I also really wish I could find a video of “He’s Fine” to share with you because I loved it and would love to listen to it again. I guess I’ll have to wait for the next album! Here they are on Jay Leno playing “Tomorrow Will Be Kinder,” which is on The Hunger Games sountrack. Check out “Rattle My Bones” to get a sense of their more upbeat side. They’re great.

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Lydia and Laura Rogers are The Secret Sisters

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John Paul White and his band took the stage and he poured his heart out for us. He played fifteen songs for a captivated audience (I still can’t believe I got to see him play in such a small venue from the front row!). He talked a lot with us about feeling conflicted about the songs that started to pour out of him because he knew he’d want to share them with the world and touring meant he’d have to spend some time away from his family. He asked us to come talk to him after the show to give him feedback about what resonated with us and what didn’t. I can’t think of a time a musician wore his heart on his sleeve more at a show. It was humbling to witness someone who so desperately wants his music to connect with people. His voice was clear and haunting as ever, and The Secret Sisters joined him throughout his set and added beautiful harmonies that amplified the message.

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Lydia Rogers of The Secret Sisters and John Paul White

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It was pretty incredible to stand right next to this man during his set!

John Paul shared with us a song about his grandparents. He said he appreciates music you can step inside and become the character in, but didn’t know how to feel about this particular song because “I loved my grandfather and thought he walked on water, but he did not. He had a lot of demons and my grandmother raised fourteen children by herself.” He played “No One Will Ever Love You,” which was featured on season one of Nashville. It’s easy to be a character in this song, John Paul—“Don’t you try to tell me someone’s waiting/They’re not waiting for you/Oh and don’t you try to tell me that you’re wanted/That you’re needed/Cause it’s not true.” Oh my heart. Check out “The Martyr” on NPR Music and “What’s So” at Rolling Stone. I am so eager to have my hands on John Paul White’s upcoming album, “Beulah,” which will be released August 19. Thanks for coming back into our world and putting yourself out there so honestly, John Paul. You’ve been missed.

xo,

bree

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Gregory Alan Isakov with MYRO and the Ghost Orchestra

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

State Theatre, Portland, Maine

I saw Gregory Alan Isakov open for my beloved Brandi Carlile back in 2009 at South Portland High School and was captivated by his lyrics and airy voice. I waited in a long line after the show that night to buy his 2009 album, This Empty Northern Hemisphere, and was really excited to hear Brandi Carlile’s beautiful voice singing along on so much of it. That album is one that you should listen to right now, actually. I saw Gregory Alan Isakov once more in 2011, but sadly not again until April of 2015. I was in love then, and my sweetie joined me for the show and fell in love with Gregory Alan Isakov, too.

Here’s the problem with introducing people you love to musicians you love—sometimes you aren’t in love anymore, and your ex comes to see a musician you introduced them to with the person they started dating a curious two weeks after you ended a two year long relationship. It was awful. I’d been excited about this show (obviously), and my steadfast concert companion Colin kindly bought us tickets for this reserved seating show at State Theatre the day tickets went on sale and our seats were front row center. Problem was, my ex and his girlfriend were just one row behind us. Thank goodness they were stage left and we were stage right, but eight people between us was really not enough for my concert enjoyment. Anyhow, I am human and I was so upset and jittery to see my manipulative, freeloading ex with his no-longer-new girlfriend that I was shaky for the vast majority of the show. If Colin hadn’t been there, I would definitely have left my front row seat and gone home before the show even started. Thinking back to this night, I feel a pit in my stomach and remember how distracted, sad, and angry I was the whole time. I tried to consciously focus on enjoying Gregory’s enchanting voice, Jeb Bows’ positive energy while he danced with his violin, or the powerful, full sound generated by having the Maine Youth Rock Orchestra and the Ghost Orchestra on stage all night, too, but I failed miserably. Coincidentally, my ex asked to borrow the very Gregory Alan Isakov CD I bought the night I first saw him live all those years ago, and he still has it.

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I am grateful that Colin posted the night’s setlist on setlist.fm (his concert schedule is far more impressive than mine, by the way), because you can click on the “play” arrow to the right of the first song of the night, and it will auto play all of the songs in order for you. I am taking this time to hear the show again (pretty much for the first time) right now, and these songs are so layered and beautiful. GAI played five songs from This Empty Northern Hemisphere, which is a perfect album. He is wonderful live—totally not interested in being the center of attention and humble and genuine. I will hopefully feel better next time he’s in town. Or I’ll just go to one of his shows farther away. Either way, he is not to be missed. I’ll close with apt lyrics from one of my favorite GAI songs—“The Moon Song”—“and those broken hearted lovers/they got nothing on me.”

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Gregory Alan Isakov with the Colorado Symphony is available now. Here’s some praise for his new album. Here’s a biographical piece in the New York Times about GAI balancing music and farming.

xo,

bree

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The Dixie Chicks with Anderson East

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Darling’s Waterfront Pavilion, Bangor, Maine

We all have songs that bring us right back to a particular moment in our lives. The first song I ever sang in public on my own as an adult was “Wide Open Spaces” by the Dixie Chicks. I performed at an open mic competition in the pub my senior year of college and thought I was going to throw up because I was so nervous. Instead, I won the competition and tickets to our annual Spring Gala. I’ll never forget how that song pushed me to find my own voice, even when it was terrifying. So, when I saw that the Dixie Chicks were going to tour after a decade-long hiatus, you’d better believe I waited by the computer and treated myself to fancy seats in the 13th row. This was a bucket list show—my first time seeing Natalie Maines, Martie Maguire, and Emily Robison live—and I couldn’t wait for June 16 to arrive. Since we had three snow days this school year, it turned out that it was my last school night of the year, but well worth my first trip to Bangor’s ENORMOUS Darling’s Waterfront Pavilion (I had no idea my hometown had such an immense concert venue!) for the show. My dad was my date, and he leaned over early in the show to say that they were really good (this is high praise from him) and that Natalie had a great singing voice (that’s really high praise from him). I had no doubt. And I agree completely—the Dixie Chicks sounded fantastic. They haven’t toured in a decade, but they didn’t miss a beat.

Backing up a tiny bit, my dad and I arrived just as Anderson East began his set. I’d seen him open for my beloved Brandi Carlile at the State Theatre in Portland in the spring of 2015. He has grit in his voice, and I liked that his band has a horn section. He played his radio hits “Devil in Me” (a song he introduced by saying it was about “fornicating with a preacher’s daughter”), “Satisfy Me,” and covered Mariah Carey’s “Always Be My Baby.” Dad leaned over and told me he sounded like Joe Cocker. I wondered if Anderson East’s girlfriend Miranda Lambert was in town, too. She’d joined him a couple of months earlier on stage for a song, but we had no such luck. He wrapped his set with another song I liked—“All I’ll Ever Need.” At some point during Anderson East’s set, one of my delightful former students and her mom came to sit in the two seats immediately next to us. Such a big venue, and yet such a small world!

A bit later, Prince’s “Let’s Go Crazy” started playing, and the Dixie Chicks and their band took the stage wearing black and white to bring Maine the long-awaited DCX MMXVI World Tour. Even their instruments were black and white. It was visually impressive, but then a plethora of beautiful background videos and still images filled an enormous screen behind them and made the enormous venue feel a lot more intimate. Natalie Maines opened the show by letting us know they were going to “attempt to entertain us” and that they fondly remembered playing a festival in Maine years ago and it was the first time a big crowd had known the words to their songs. At some point, she joked that she hoped we wouldn’t wait ten years to invite them back.

The Dixie Chicks played a solid 25 songs. Since they haven’t spent the last decade writing new music together, they played most of their big hits and supplemented with some covers of Prince, Bob Dylan, and Beyonce. I thought opening with “The Long Way Around” was an apt choice, and I was pleased to hear three Patty Griffin songs (y’all know wildly talented songstress Patty Griffin is a native of nearby Old Town, Maine, right?)—“Truth #2,” “Top of the World,” and “Please Don’t Let Me Die in Florida.” I was THRILLED to hear “Top of the World” live, but it would have been better if the drunk twentysomethings behind us hadn’t been shouting and taking pictures to share on Snapchat the whole song. CONCERT ETIQUETTE, people. It DOES NOT MATTER that we’re in a huge outdoor venue—you should still let people listen to the songs they came to hear in person. Pretty, pretty please. Oh! The Chicks played a Prince song, too, and it was STUNNING. “Nothing Compares 2 U” was lovely. The twentysomethings were even quiet for that one. That good.

The Chicks came back from a video interlude and sat right along the edge of the stage to play a stripped down “Travelin’ Soldier.” Getting only mildly political, the Chicks performed “Ready To Run” while we were bombarded with fast moving images of Donald Trump, Ted Cruz, Chris Christie, Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, and Elizabeth Warren—just to name a few. Confetti cannons spit out tons of red, white, and blue pieces of paper, and we were close enough to catch some (cheesy, but I have a piece on my fridge as a show souvenir). “Landslide” was lovely and the whole crowd sang along. We were all pretty excited to hear “Cowboy Take Me Away” and “Wide Open Spaces” back-to-back. They wrapped their set with “Sin Wagon” and the crowd erupted. The Chicks came back to the stage for “Not Ready to Make Nice,” which is a triumphant comeback song. If you haven’t seen Shut Up and Sing, the 2007 documentary about the insane, life-threatening backlash the Dixie Chicks suffered after Natalie made an anti-G.W. Bush comment on stage, I highly recommend it. A decade later, and even though so much has changed, so much still hasn’t. The Chicks ended the night on a hopeful note, closing with a cover of Ben Harper’s “Better Way.” They were joined on stage by about a dozen kids playing instruments under a giant rainbow heart. It’s been ten years, and the Chicks’ message is still the same—and their devoted fans poured into an enormous venue to sing along.

xo,

bree

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Brandi Carlile

Saturday, June 4, 2016

Thompson’s Point, Portland, Maine

If Brandi Carlile is coming to town, I’m going to be there. It’s a no-brainer. Brandi and the Hanseroth twins—Tim and Phil—bring it every single time. They’re easily one of my top five live acts. The last time I got to see them was at the State Theatre back in May of 2015, which they sold out in two days. People packed into Thompson’s Point to see them on this cloudy night, and it was lovely to be surrounded by good people and good music. This was the furthest I’ve ever been from the stage at a Brandi show, and since proximity is paramount to my concert going experience, this was my least favorite Brandi show to date, but it was my fault for being over scheduled and not making the show my top priority. I should have gotten to Thompson’s Point when doors opened to get a spot up front against the stage like I normally would, but it was my 15th college reunion weekend and my dear friends’ daughter’s second birthday, and I tried to do it all. I’ve had the front row Brandi experience a few times, so I am still a whole person, but it’s hard for me to be so far way. A few of the perks of our spot, though, were that we got to witness a sweet proposal by the entrance, had room for our friends Kay and Spud to join us for the second half of the show, and that Portland songstresses Monique Barrett and Sorcha Cribben-Merrill spotted me on their way to the beer tent and we sang a song together.

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My 15th college reunion! And I just moved back to town, too!

Mira is 2

Mira is 2!

Proposal

Check out the newly engaged couple kissing on the right. Congratulations!

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This makes my heart happy! I felt like a celebrity when fabulously talented songstresses Monique Barrett and Sorcha Cribben-Merrill stopped by!

Girls Night

Thanks for taking this, Sarah! I’m rarely in concert pictures!

Sarah, Megan, and I were in the first row of low folding chairs, which is the first section back from the standing general admission area. Thompson’s Point is absolutely gorgeous, and if you’re someone who likes the feel of a festival, it’s going to be right up your alley. They have a handful of delicious food trucks, a fully stocked beer tent, and are in a beautiful spot to watch the sunset.

 

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I found this information very helpful!

Brandi opened with “Again Today,” and it was great to hear one of her “older” songs. I love “The Eye” and “That Wasn’t Me,” and was so glad to hear both. Brandi invited an adorable kiddo named Isabelle from the crowd up on stage to sing “Keep Your Heart Young” with her and it was precious. I’m so glad someone got it on video. It’ll make your day to watch. Ruby Amanfu opened the show, but I missed all but her very last song. I hate to miss an opening act, too, but I did this concert experience totally unlike the norm. I was glad when she joined Brandi for “Shadow on the Wall.”

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Courtesy of @statetheatreportland on Instagram

Brandi and the Twins

Brandi Carlile, the Hanseroth twins, and the band

BrandiBrandi introduced a new song about the “beauty and terror of being a mother” aptly titled “Mother.” I love that Brandi is open and shares her life with her fans. She reaches out and offers herself to the audience and it’s impossible not to feel that positive energy at her shows. They ended their set with a powerful, beautifully orchestrated “Pride and Joy,” and came back to play a two song encore—Prince’s “Nothing Compares 2 U” (which gave me chills) and Led Zeppelin’s “Going to California.”

Brandi Carlile and the twins have soul and sincerity in spades, and getting the opportunity to see them live is a treat. Sarah dropped me off back on campus, and I rejoined my 15th college reunion and stayed up until last call dancing to Boston’s phenomenal Soul City. Quite a little Saturday! Thanks, Brandi, Tim, and Phil! Y’all rock!

xo,

bree

PS—I found a driver’s license on my walk to Thompson’s Point, and mailed it to Jamie on Monday morning with my card. She emailed me a very sweet note, which included “It’s cliché I know, but I am so thankful that there are people in the world like you.” #goodconcertkarma

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