Tag Archives: Blue

Ben Cosgrove and Friends

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Blue, Portland, Maine

My friend Ben Cosgrove is an insanely talented pianist and a mighty fine accordion player, too. I met him back in 2014 when he produced our friend Max Garcia Conover’s Ellery album. Ben tours non-stop, crisscrossing the United States and playing really any venue that will have him. I follow Ben on Instagram, and he’ll post a beautiful picture from St. Louis one night and from Wyoming the next. His determination to play for people is really commendable. His music is inspired by the landscape he experiences in his travel, which is plentiful. I heard him play on 98.9 WCLZ last summer, and if you like context like I do, check out my friendKen Templeton’s interview with Ben ahead of his 2017 release, Salt.

Happy 30th, Ben Cosgrove!

Ben turned 30 last week, and he asked the kind folks at Blue if they’d open their doors on a Tuesday (it’s usually their day off) so he could play a birthday show. It was such a treat to spend the evening listening to Ben and his talented friends play for us. I showed up while Hannah Daman (she was a highlight of my 2017concerts) was on stage. Griffin Sherry and Max Davis, both from the Ghost of Paul Revere, played a couple of songs with Ben, as did Max Garcia Conover. To close the night, Ben and his friends covered Dawes’ “All Your Favorite Bands.”Ben played with the Ghost of Paul Reverelast summer when they opened for Guster at Thompson’s Point, and he is about to head out on tour with them for the next month or so.

If you’re sad you missed this fun night, Ben, Max Garcia Conover, Griffin Sherry, and Max Davis play tonight at Blue at 6pm.

xo,

bree

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Rachael & Vilray with The Brother Brothers

Saturday, January 27, 2018

Blue, Portland, Maine

This evening was an absolute delight. I felt lucky to get a ticket for this intimate, sold out show in such a teeny venue in the first place, and it was a treat. I made it to Blue around 8:20, but was still able to grab seats for Marian and me at Sean and Rosie’s front row table (they came all the way from Canada to see the show).

I was impressed with The Brother Brothers. I love their folky, harmonic sound. David and Adam Moss are identical twins from Peoria, Illinois who write and record together and live in Brooklyn. David plays cello and guitar, and Adam plays the fiddle. Their harmonies were lovely, and I was taken with their songs–especially Tugboats” and “Cairo, Ill.” Definitely check out their Audiotree session.

Adam and David Moss are the Brother Brothers

Concert etiquette gets an A+ for the evening. It was such a welcome change to see a show where the audience was totally respectful and engaged.

Rachael Price and Vilray (pronounced Vill-ree) took the stage after a short intermission. I started seeing Lake Street Dive live back in 2011, but it’s been ages since I’ve seen Rachael perform in such a small room. Rachael and Vilray met at New England Conservatory of Music 15 years ago, and are clearly good friends. They faced each other and shared one microphone for the night–performing jazz standards and new songs that have the feel of the Jazz Age, but with updated, entertaining lyrics.

Rachael Price and Vilray

Jazz is not even remotely my favorite genre, but I’d listen to Rachael Price sing the phone book and enjoy it. I particularly liked “Let’s Make Love on this Plane” and “Do Friends Fall in Love.” Rachael and Vilray were warm and interactive with the audience, and they told us the stories behind most of the songs they sang, which I really value as a concert-goer.

I know a lot of you were disappointed that you couldn’t get tickets for either night, so check out this video of a show Rachael and Vilray played in Brooklyn to get a feel for what you missed. I feel lucky to have been in the room.

xo,

bree

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Ellis Paul with Laurie MacAllister

Friday, December 29, 2017

One Longfellow Square, Portland, Maine

This was my 49th Ellis Paul show! I hope I get to sing on stage with him at my 50th show. I can sing, Ellis!

I started seeing Ellis Paul in 2002, so that’s 15 years of great music I’ve gotten to hear him perform live. He’s still my favorite singer songwriter, and I love seeing him live at his now annual warm up to New Year’s Eve show at One Longfellow Square. I used to ring in the New Year with Ellis and friends every year at Club Passim in Cambridge, Massachusetts, but Portland is so much closer!  

I picked up my friend Hedda in the snow and we slowly made it to Portland on a slippery highway. We had a delicious dinner nearby at Mi Sen, but were squeezed for time and had to miss seeing my talented pianist friend, Ben Cosgrove, at Blue. We made it to One Longfellow Square right after 7 to get good seats up front, and there were easily already 25 people in the room. I know where the super fans sit (I am a fan, not a super fan), and decided I needed a couple of rows of buffer, so grabbed seats for Colin, Hedda, and me in the fourth row. We chatted for an hour and then Laurie MacAllister (of Red Molly) took the stage to start the show.

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David Glaser, Laurie McAllister, and Radoslav Lorkovic

Hedda saw her first Ellis Paul show (my 46th) with me last year at Brunswick’s Unitarian Universalist Church, and Laurie sang with him then, too. We thought their chemistry was obvious, and wondered if they were a couple back then. They were, we discovered at this show. Laurie MacAllister has a very pretty voice and was so grateful to perform her first solo show in 14 years in front of such a polite audience. Her new solo record, The Lies the Poets Tell, is out in late January. It’s a cover album of songs from artists you may not know–including Shawn Mullins (one of my all time favorites), Mark Erelli (who Laurie called her favorite songwriter and urged us to see live), Antje Duvekot, oh, and some guy named Ellis Paul. She opened with Shawn Mullins’ “My Stupid Heart.”David Glaser joined her on guitar–she told us she’d heard him play last year during preparations for Ellis’ annual New Year’s Eve shows and asked him to be her guitarist on her new album–and Radoslav Lorkovic, the “Croatian Sensation,” accompanied on piano and accordion. Laurie told us she met Rad for the first time back in 2005 when they played at the same music festival. When she and her Red Molly bandmates told him they were off to New York City for a gig later that evening, he asked if he could come with them and play, too, which they all quickly agreed to. David, Rad, and Laurie were also Ellis’ band that evening. They are obviously friends and it was fun to watch them together.

Ellis Paul took the stage to a sold out crowd after intermission. He told us he wrote a song with a friend in mind that was supposed to be more of a joke, but turned into his love song, “I Ain’t No Jesus.” I’d never heard Ellis talk about dating Laurie before, but he talked about her saying “I’ll Never Be this Young Again” in reference to recording a new album, and he stole her line and wrote a song featuring it. Laurie interjected that she came down to the living room the next morning and he played it for her–completely finished overnight. He told us it was one of the first times he’d ever played it live.

Ellis also played another new song I hadn’t heard before, which is always exciting when you see someone play as often as I do. He projected a picture onto the screen behind him and it was of Ellis and his father in front of a huge fire. He told us about a family reunion that turned into a major fire house fire over the 4th of July weekend in 1979. He thanked his relatives in the crowd who were there to support him, and told us about a relative who’d fought for the Union Army in the Civil War and was injured at Gettysburg. They gave him a farm–150 acres in Wasburn, Maine–and every generation in his family has produced potato farmers since then until now. He joked that he went into the more lucrative folk singer business. His grandparents had 9 kids and 40 grandchildren. He laughed as he told us “none of the names have been changed because everyone who is guilty deserves to be in this song.”

Ellis told us he’d record an album in 2018, and I think I’m most looking forward to “Scarecrow in a Corn Maze”–a song about a soldier injured in Iraq who comes home from war and struggles. The chorus goes, “scarecrow in a corn maze, just trying to find some way out.” Ellis has always been an excellent storyteller. His songs are relatable because they tell real human stories. This song stuck out to me the most among songs I don’t know very well. We sang along to a song that Ellis wrote about all of the states he’s performed in called “So You Ain’t From these Parts.” The verse about Maine features the crazy names of places here from Damariscotta to the Cobbosseecontee.

Every year, Ellis and his friends play a medley of songs during their NYE shows. This year, they paid tribute to music legends lost in the last couple of years–Tom Petty, Glen Campbell, and Glenn Frey. Their cover of “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around” was incredible. I’ll admit I’d never heard Glen Campbell’s “Wichita Lineman” before. Everyone came off the stage into the audience and sang “Seven Bridges Road” (famously covered by the Eagles) for us.

Ellis thanked us for our continued support and for coming out in the bitter cold. He told us his kid just got $3,300 braces, and chuckled when he told us that we’d paid for them. I figure my 49 concert tickets will pay for at least a year of a teenager’s car insurance when his girls start driving.

Did we all sing along to “The World Ain’t Slowin’ Down”to close the night? I think we did. I am sleep deprived from New Year’s Eve last night. Thanks for a lovely evening of music that always makes me feel like I’m home, Ellis and friends. I’ll see you soon!

Happy 2018! Let’s all hope for goodness and light in the year ahead!

xo,

bree

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Max Garcia Conover

Thursday, September 4, 2014

Blue, Portland, Maine

*Max’s ellery release show is tomorrow night at Mayo Street Arts at 7:30pm. We are all so excited for this moment for Max. The album is beautiful. He, Sophie, and their dog Arlo are about to embark on a many month long national tour in their little RV, so this is your last chance to see Max locally for some time. See y’all tomorrow!? Regular whatbreesees contributor Ken Templeton saw Max last week at Blue. I decided I couldn’t muster the strength to stay up that late so far from home on a school night! Thanks for sharing, Ken!*

I moved to Massachusetts in July. It’s been wonderful–the people here have been incredibly welcoming and outgoing in a way that has surprised me (I grew up in New Jersey–‘nuff said). Musically, it’s been incredible. I got to see Sturgill Simpson the other night and have my eye on Shovels & Rope and Charlie Parr in the next couple of weeks. One thing I am bummed about though is missing some of my friend Max Garcia Conover’s gigs as he embarks on his national tour in support of his truly stunning album ellery. But I happened to be in Portland last week and caught his show with Matt Wheeler at Blue.

Max trades songs with other songwriters at Blue once a month. This is fun because you almost always get a very different sensibility from each songwriter, and this night was no different. Matt’s songs are mostly narrative in nature, with strong nods to literature and history. One song, “Lexington” describes a young man longing both to join the revolution against Britain and to see his love; another song “River (A Dark Chase)” is based on a chapter in Les Miserables. I walked in as Matt was covering Josh Ritter’s tune Idaho,” and there are many similarities between Matt’s songwriting and Ritter’s approach. You can imagine these lyrics (from Matt’s song “Gold”) on a Josh Ritter album: “Sometimes bitter roots / Give rise to sweeter fruits / And all your sticks and stones, they turn to gold.” Matt and Josh use similarly playful rhyme schemes and opposition of emotions. Matt’s guitar playing is rhythmic and crisp, both while strumming and finger-picking, and he engages the audience nicely by asking for sing-alongs with songs like Indigo.” He ended the show with a beautiful version of Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah.”

Max Garcia Conover back in July at One Longfellow Square in Portland

Max Garcia Conover back in July at One Longfellow Square in Portland

Max’s songs during the set were mostly from ellery. The crowd at Blue was so attentive–they were really there to listen to music. Everyone was leaning forward when Max sat down at a table with his wife Sophie Nelson to sing Wildfires Outside Laramie, WY.” He said he wrote the song as a reflection on the times like Ferguson, where Max’s friend DeRay has been recently, holding a sign “My blackness is not a weapon.” Max described DeRay as one of the nicest people he’s ever met, and it is so difficult that the nicest person he’s ever met has to hold that sign. The performance was perfect–understated, emotional (but not sentimental), and it felt like we were at a house concert for a few minutes.

Keep Us All is the first track on ellery, but Max wasn’t sure it would even make the record. His genius producer, Ben Cosgrove, convinced him to lead off the album with it, and it’s grown so much on Max that he has added a transfixing, fingerpicked introduction to the live performance of the song. Max played one of his older songs, from his first EP, “As Much A Rising Sun As A Setting One,” and that was beautiful (here is an almost-as-good-if-you-can’t-be-there-in-person version). The Songs is another favorite from ellery, with it’s perfect juxtaposition of truth and artifice:  “time busted engines barked and choked / forgotten for useless as wedding coats / the towers of men the starving ford / he don’t want truth he wants something more / subcontracted gardeners for cul de sacs / slow moving parades of white cadillacs / the national mascot, the savior sighs / they don’t want truth just tell better lies.” The Start of Fables,” was great too, as the audience sang loudly along with the chorus:  “Honey we been tryin’ / honey we been tryin’ / honey we tryin’ like a barnswallow tries / piling sticks so high.”

Max hits the road on September 12. Check out his tour dates here and pick up ellery so you can sing along.

Check out Max on his upcoming national tour!

Check out Max on his upcoming national tour!

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Geneviève Beaudoin

Thursday, March 21, 2013

Blue, Portland, Maine

It’s with a lot of pride that I introduce you to Geneviève Beaudoin, whose name you’ll surely be hearing again. I met Genny when she walked into my classroom in May of 2007, a polite and wide eyed eighth grader visiting my high school social studies classroom on Step Up Day. She was an exceptional student in my Ancient World Cultures class as a ninth grader in the fall—a true scholar who saw connections between the past and present and understood how and why to glean lessons from the past. I was thrilled to have her. I have never been more impressed at a school musical than I was when I saw her as the lead in Once Upon a Mattress that year. She was charismatic and a pleasure to watch on stage. I’ll never forget how blown away I was when Genny played a song at one of the open mic nights I hosted at Mt. Ararat during her senior year. She fingerpicked an acoustic guitar with ease and I was impressed by her strong voice. At the end of her performance, I asked her who wrote the song. When she said that she had, I didn’t believe her at first. It showed wisdom beyond her years.

All grown up now, Geneviève Beaudoin is a student at NYU and an up and coming singer songwriter. In her first year at NYU, she performed in and won her dorm’s talent show which gave her a spot in NYU’s talent showcase. Here’s where it gets interesting—Lady Gaga once lived in the same freshman dorm and also performed in and won the same dorm’s talent show. Through the transitive property, Geneviève is on her way to extraordinary stardom!

“KS” wrote a spot on description of Geneviève and her music that’s on both her website and her Facebook page:

“Geneviève Beaudoin is 19 but she’s not young.

The budding singer-song writer has been shaped by a vibrant family–half American, half French—and has learned from different homes in Lyon, France; New York, New York and a small town in rural Maine. To that end, Geneviève’s original songs are raw, multi-faceted, and mature. With their perception and poetry, her lyrics reflect a solidified spirit—and the voice that sings them is one skilled beyond others of her years. Her folk and blues compositions are at times playful and witty; other times, achingly poignant. Regardless of its emotion, though, or the language in which it’s sung, Geneviève’s art is always stirring.

She has been performing at venues across coastal and southern Maine this summer, and will release her first EP soon.”

I got to Blue in Portland a little before Geneviève’s set. It was great to see her while she was home on break and to catch up with her dear friend Mary and her delightful family—even her dad, who went to Colby. (No hard feelings, John!) Geneviève introduced me again to Dietrich Strause who was playing after her. I saw him open for Ben Sollee at One Longfellow Square back in August. Dietrich is very good and I wish I’d been able to stay for his set, too.

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Geneviève Beaudoin

Genevieve Beaudoin

A small, but attentive crowd (including Portland singer songwriter Max Garcia Conover) gathered as Geneviève took the stage with her original bluesy folk songs. Here’s her setlist from the night:

  • “Go On,” which Geneviève wrote with her friend Kate on the quad at Bowdoin College—my alma mater!
  • “Selfish Mind,” which is the first song Geneviève ever wrote. It was for her high school sweetheart essentially declaring her love for him. He eventually told her he didn’t like the song and they broke up shortly after. This is the song I heard Genny play at open mic night her senior year, so I was one of the first lucky people to hear it. It’s full of wisdom.
  • “Little Fangs” was written from the former boyfriend’s perspective. I liked the lyric “put your ghosts on the table/ring ’em out until you’re able/to luck up with your bursting eyes/The fire inside/it does, it dies.”
  • “Another Secret”
  • “Settling” was dedicated to Geneviève’s mom (it’s her favorite) who sang along from the audience. It was adorable.
  • “I Could,” which featured some great guitar thumping percussion.
  • “Fatigue,” which is a new song Geneviève called a work in progress, but was perhaps my favorite song of the night. It was inspired by the short film, Destino.
  • “Blued Metal,” another new song and also a work in progress, was inspired by a passage from Cold Mountain. Geneviève asked us before she played it if any of us had read the book. I think I shouted out that it was “so depressing.” She said, “I know! No one warned me!”
  • “Stay,” which was Geneviève’s last song and one she said was about her fears and the things she’s bad at. I liked the image she painted with the lyric “I’m your paper doll/you’re cutting me down.”

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By the end of her set, I’d written down and then underlined (twice) “NOT 19 years old!” Geneviève’s songs are mature and wise despite her youth, and she is such a pleasure to see live. You can keep in touch with her on her Facebook page (where she graciously promotes this blog!), her website, or on Twitter. Definitely don’t pass up the chance to see Geneviève live. Genny—thanks for such a lovely evening! Can’t wait to see you again soon!

xo,

bree

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