Tag Archives: Gardiner Maine

Gardiner’s 7th Annual Swine & Stein Oktoberfest

Saturday, October 8, 2016

Water Street, Downtown Gardiner, Maine

I lived in Gardiner for a decade, but moved over the summer back to Brunswick to be closer to work. I really grew to love that sweet little town and miss it a lot. I was excited to spend the day in my former town at one of my favorite annual events, our seventh annual Swine & Stein Oktoberfest. Sponsored by the dedicated folks at Gardiner Main Street, it combines Maine beer, Maine pork, and live music from Maine artists. Add in a hilarious beard and mustache competition, a frozen t-shirt contest, butchering demonstrations, and a rock-paper-scissors competition, and you’ve got a great day. Swine & Stein is always wonderful, and this year, with warm temperatures and some sunshine, was no different.

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Beautiful downtown Gardiner, Maine

I was thrilled to be asked back as a local judge for the third annual Swine & Stein Beard and Mustache Competition, sponsored by Monkitree. It was ultimately the reason I got my concussed self (I hit my head a bit too hard during Brazilian Jiu Jitsu a couple of days earlier) up to Gardiner even though I was feeling a little dazed. The men who compete are always smiling and come back from year to year and we have a great time.

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Nearly all of the competitors in the 3rd annual Swine & Stein Beard and Mustache Competition!

We were treated to talented musical acts on the main stage all day—Dominic Lavoie, Oktoberfest German Band, Gunther Brown, Tricky Britches, and The Scolded Dogs. Last year’s cool new additions to the schedule were both back—the “Beer U” tent hosted by Craft Beer Cellar and butchering demonstrations by Emery’s Meat and Produce. I ended up missing the 5th Annual Rock-Paper-Scissors Competition because I ran into old friends and we chatted through it. Next year. It’s one of my favorite things!

Thanks to everyone who worked so hard to make Swine & Stein a great day! Gardiner Main Street and all of the many, many volunteers I saw in bright orange t-shirts—you rock! See you next year! If you’d like to use one of my photos somehow, please give photo credit to Bree Candland of whatbreesees.com. Thank you!

xo,

bree

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Ellis Paul

Friday, September 16, 2016

Johnson Hall, Gardiner, Maine

Ellis Paul is my favorite singer-songwriter. A Maine native, he’s an incredible storyteller, and I have taken every opportunity possible over the last thirteen years to see him live. This was a delightful night, and I’m so glad to have been in the audience. I’d asked Johnson Hall’s Executive Director Mike Miclon to bring Ellis Paul to Johnson Hall when he first took charge of the venue a couple of years ago, and he readily obliged. Before Mike introduced Ellis to the stage, he singled me out and said that this was my 47th Ellis Paul show and gave a kind shout out to whatbreesees.com, as well. Mike said that he trusts my taste in music, so takes my booking advice seriously. It was such a feel good moment for me, and one of the reasons I love seeing shows at Johnson Hall in teeny Gardiner, Maine so much. It feels like home.

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Ellis Paul

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Ellis took the stage and said his pickup on his guitar wasn’t working, so he came down into the audience and played the bulk of his set unplugged from there. It was such an intimate experience, and we loved it. Ellis had written a new song about traveling that he was still using notes for, and a sweet older gentleman was clearly over the moon to be asked to hold it for Ellis while he sang.

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Blurry but precious

Ellis told us about his experience putting Woody Guthrie’s song “God’s Promise” to music (even after embarrassing himself by awkwardly showing Woody’s son Arlo his Woody Guthrie tattoo). I wasn’t surprised that Ellis ended the night with an impromptu ditty on the piano about how women outnumber men 60/40 in colleges and universities and are clearly poised to take over the world. He sang that he’d be voting for Hillary for his two daughters, made a joke about Trump’s bad hair, and got off stage. It turned out that someone in the audience that night wrote him a letter to explain why Hillary is the Anti-Christ and admonished Ellis for talking about politics at a folk show. Clearly, someone is very lacking in the roots and purpose of folk music!  

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From Ellis Paul’s Facebook page

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As always, it’s a pleasure to see Ellis live. I went up to see the unfinished Opera House on the top levels of Johnson Hall after the show (there’s been some new money pledged to the renovation project, too!) and just before I left, Mike told Ellis that I can really sing and that we should do a duet at my 50th Ellis show. Sounds like a plan to me!

xo,

bree

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Penny and Sparrow with Rose Cousins

Sunday, April 24, 2016

One Longfellow Square, Portland, Maine

I sold my house! I moved ten years of my possessions to my new place, which is half the size of my beloved old place! I also threw a senior prom for almost 250, senior awards night, graduation for almost 180, and went on the Project Graduation trip with my seniors. Now I’m feeling settled in my new place and am SO READY to get back to more live music in my life. I don’t know about you, but times are heavy and music helps me through. I offer you “Rise Up” from Andra Day at Austin City Limits, just in case you need a boost right this minute.

I have pondered what to write about the incredible Penny and Sparrow show I saw back in late April at One Longfellow Square for a long while. It was incredible and one of the BEST SHOWS I HAVE EVER SEEN. That’s a little hard to process, just like the show still is. I wish I could relive every moment. I am so glad my steadfast concert companion Colin joined me, because I needed backup. This show was intense. Overwhelming. Wonderful. It hit me so hard in the feels that I needed a tissue.

I’d been lucky to see Canada’s talented Rose Cousins back in March in my former sweet little town of Gardiner, Maine at Johnson Hall. She is hilarious and gritty and open live and is a true entertainer. Juxtaposed with her beautiful, depressing songs, it’s a lot to see her perform. It’s a bit of a rollercoaster between the sad songs and her sharp banter and storytelling. It prepared me really well for this night, though.

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Rose Cousins

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Rose Cousins took the stage and gushed about Austin’s Penny and Sparrow. She told us they’d met in January at the Ann Arbor Folk Festival and that “these men have more feelings than me.” And listening to them is like “wearing your favorite hoodie right out of the dryer.” She joked that it was nice to be touring with people who just play sad music “so I don’t have to explain myself.” Rose opened with a cover of Lori McKenna’s “Shake” (I haven’t seen Lori in ages, but her songs are so good) and “Go First,” which was featured in the finale of season 9 of Grey’s Anatomy (but not in the kind of scene Rose envisioned for her song).

We all sang along with Rose’s cover of “What’s Love Got to Do With It,” and Rose told quippy stories in between these somber songs, including “Farmer’s Wife,” which she told us was inspired by her sister, who is (in fact) a farmer’s wife. Rose told us about her trip to Ireland last May to write and record a forthcoming album, which I am eager to hear. Rose wrapped her set with “Heart Be With Me Now,” “I Make Way For Love,” and “Tender is the Man,” all of which I assume/hope will be on her new album. She left the stage by telling us that there are “no tenderer men” than Andy and Kyle of Penny and Sparrow.

Andy Baxter and Kyle Jahnke took the stage and warmed the crowd immediately with light humor about our “summer” weather in Maine that had them both wearing double coats. Then, Kyle quietly strummed his guitar, Andy put his hands in his pockets and leaned toward the microphone, and “Gold” sprung from their mouths. It was one of those rare moments at a show when you start to get sad because you realize the night will end. I felt like that from the first note.

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Andy Baxter and Kyle Jahnke are Penny and Sparrow

I was not the only one entranced by Penny and Sparrow. Their sparse, evocative songs—Andy’s straightforward voice and Kyle’s gentle strumming and harmonies—are stunning. Kyle read our group response beautifully and told us our “give a damn” meter was high and it was a huge compliment to them and thanked us for listening. I laughed out loud in between songs at Kyle’s jokes, and then teared up during the songs. It was a lot to take in. Kyle told us that he gets it’s “taxing” (that’s the word he used) to listen to their music and genuinely appreciated we were along for the ride. He said it’s good to “shake your emotional snow globe” from time to time so that you don’t harden and can process your feelings. No kidding.

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Penny and Sparrow hit me in the feels with “Finery” and “Catalogue,” did a complete turnaround to sing a few lighthearted bars of “Hero” by Nickelback, and then got right back to it with Patsy Cline’s “I Fall to Pieces.” Seeing them live is a ride I would have lined up for again immediately after the show. I wish I could relive the magic of this night. I wish you were all there, too.

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Kyle gave us a lengthy scenario about running into an ex at a dinner party to introduce “Bed Down.” He talked about a kind of love where you are intimately aware of the struggles but don’t leave—a love with “no escape hatch.” I’d seen NPR Music feature “Bed Down” as a “Song We Love” back in February, and that’s when I learned that my beloved John Paul White (formerly of The Civil Wars) produced their album. I got to see John Paul again a few weeks ago from the front row at Cafe 939 in Boston and he is so incredibly down to earth and talented. What a pairing for Penny and Sparrow’s third studio album.

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Rose Cousins joined Andy and Kyle for “Duet.” Andy introduced the song by saying there just weren’t enough songs about married love, so they wrote one. He said it’s about being together for a long time and still being into each other. The lyrics show resolve “Because I’ve seen you/And I know you/And I’m not going anywhere.”

This was a perfect night of music and easily one of the best shows I’ve ever seen. I wish I could do it again. Thank you, Rose, Andy, and Kyle for a cathartic night of music, storytelling, and laughter. I am in awe of all of you. You shook my emotional snow globe, and I feel better for it. Please come back to Maine again. Come together, too, if you can.

xo,

bree

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Rose Cousins, Carol Noonan, Duke Levine, and Kevin Barry

Friday, March 18, 2016

Johnson Hall, Gardiner, Maine

Talk about a delightful night full of rock solid good music, plentiful laughs, and pro-community spirit. This show was a gem. Johnson Hall Executive Artist Director Mike Miclon handed out CDs full of music from this season’s Johnson Hall artists last fall during the season reveal event, and Rose Cousins’ “Go First” played on repeat in my car for weeks. Her voice is all the best things—soulful, clear, ethereal, and evocative. I had this show circled in permanent marker on my concert calendar for months. I feel lucky to have been there.

Carol Noonan is a name you know in the Maine music scene. A singer-songwriter with a long career, she is also the mastermind behind Stone Mountain Arts Center in Brownfield, Maine. One of the things that I was struck by on this fabulous night was how complimentary she was of Gardiner and our effort to bring live music and new life to our community. When Mike welcomed everyone to the stage, he also announced that Lisa’s Legit Burritos, The Craft Beer Cellar, and Niche, Inc. (Gardiner’s new record store) were staying open late after the show and we were all going to go to all three places to support these local businesses. Carol was on board wholeheartedly. Before Stone Mountain Arts Center, Brownfield wasn’t even a blip on the map, she said. Now, it’s a music destination that has inspired a lot of growth in the area. She said “music brings a community to life.” Johnson Hall has been a tremendous part of Gardiner’s growth with Mike Miclon at the helm. Gardiner’s time is now, and we have a wonderful community—one I feel proud and fortunate to be part of.

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From left to right–Rose Cousins, Carol Noonan, Duke Levine, and Kevin Barry

Rose Cousins, Carol Noonan, Duke Levine, and Kevin Barry took the stage together and played together the bulk of the night—alternating between Carol’s songs and Rose’s songs. Rose Cousins is a singer-songwriter who grew up on a potato farm in Prince Edward Island. The baby on stage that night, Carol joked that she graduated from high school the year that Rose Cousins was born. They met because Rose sent Carol her CD If You Were For Me (2006), and even though Carol receives so many submissions at Stone Mountain that she can’t listen to many, she picked up Rose’s album because she was drawn to the horse on the cover. A decade later, and they’re friends who play music together.

 

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Duke Levine is maybe best known for touring with The J. Geils Band and Mary Chapin Carpenter. Kevin Barry is an assistant professor at Berklee College of Music in Boston and has played with Paula Cole and Mary Chapin Carpenter, as well. Duke and Kevin have played together for ages, and have both played on both Carol and Rose’s albums, too.

I particularly liked Rose’s song, “Farmer’s Wife.” Rose spoke about growing up on a farm—one of five kids—and not really having a full appreciation of her mother’s role until her sister married a farmer and started her own family. Her 2014 Stray Birds EP includes a cover of Lori McKenna’s “Shake,” which the group played for us. Lori McKenna is a folk rock star. I just wrote about hearing her song “Girl Crush” that won a Grammy for Best Country Song covered by Ellis Paul at One Longfellow Square on January 1. I’ve only managed to see Lori live a couple of times, but sadly not since 2012 at One Longfellow Square in Portland with Mark Erelli. Rose was as much a storyteller in word as in song. She introduced “Chosen” by talking about how incredible it is to be chosen by someone but how it also gives you pause to think about all the things you don’t like about yourself. Her honesty was refreshing.

We cheered at the end of this night, thoroughly entertained by the stories and songs of these four talented musicians who are also friends and so supportive of each other. They took the stage for an encore and did an awesome cover of Tina Turner’s “What’s Love Got to Do With It” that we got to sing along with. It was a lovely way to bring the night to an end together.

I’m seeing Rose again on Sunday night (April 24) at One Longfellow Square opening for Nashville’s Penny and Sparrow. I’m really looking forward to it!

xo,

bree

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Going upstairs to see the concert hall at Johnson Hall never gets old! Just wait to see how it looks fully restored!

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The Ghost of Paul Revere

Friday, March 4, 2016

Johnson Hall, Gardiner, Maine

I hadn’t seen The Ghost of Paul Revere play live in at least a year, so I was really excited for them to come play at Johnson Hall in my own sweet little town. I was only slightly tempted to stay home and binge on the fourth season of House of Cards, which was released that day, but I’m glad I made it downtown for this show instead. The Ghost of Paul Revere (GPR) had played Johnson Hall a year or so ago (I’d suggested them to Johnson Hall Executive Artistic Director Mike Miclon), and many folks in the near sell out crowd were returning to see them again.

This was the best I’d heard GPR sound since the first time I saw them play back in May of 2013 at One Longfellow Square. While I was doing research for this post, I found a quote from my May 2013 post on whatbreesees.com on The Ghost of Paul Revere’s website. Awesome!

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I love it when I show up on a band’s website! http://www.ghostofpaulrevere.com/epk/

Griffin Sherry has a clear, beautiful voice. Sean McCarthy claimed to be under the weather, but he was hilarious and kept us laughing with lots of banter anyhow. Their three part harmonies with Max Davis were lovely. Matt Young killed on harmonica. They really made me feel like I was in their living room, and that is the best kind of show possible.

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The Ghost of Paul Revere. From left to right–Matt Young, Griffin Sherry, Sean McCarthy, and Max Davis.

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“Ghostland” and “Mountain Song” were both early standouts of the night, and GPR recorded both songs during their Audiotree session. After their first show at Johnson Hall, GPR came back to film their video for “Wolves” upstairs in the stunning, unfinished upstairs concert hall. “San Antone” is easily my favorite GPR song, so I was glad to hear that one live. Their last song before intermission was a cappella. Sean asked a group of little kids in the front row if they knew what that meant. They didn’t. It was a super cute exchange. After intermission, GPR played “Ballad of the 20th Maine,” did an amazing cover of “Baba O’Riley,” and closed their set (appropriately) with “This is the End.”

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A screenshot of GPR’s “Wolves” video, shot in the unfinished upstairs concert hall at Johnson Hall in Gardiner, Maine.

After the show, Gardiner’s new-ish record store, Niche, Inc. stayed open to host folks who wanted to see their shop. I was impressed when all of the members of The Ghost of Paul Revere went over to support the store, whose owners Sam and Jason are big fans. I normally don’t chat with musicians (if they’re having an off night, I’ve found it can destroy all the love you have for their music), but since GPR did a nationwide tour with my dear friend Max Garcia Conover, I decided to break the rule. They’re all totally down to Earth, approachable guys. We got a chance to talk music for a long time, which was a sweet treat. Come back soon, guys! Thanks for a great show!

xo,

bree

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David Wilcox

Friday, December 4, 2015

Johnson Hall, Gardiner, Maine

It was a really busy Friday night in Gardiner because a lot of people were in town to enjoy Gardiner ArtWalk. I peeled myself away from some of my favorite galleries (yes, we have a few in sweet Gardiner, Maine) to grab a good seat at Johnson Hall to see David Wilcox. Executive Director Mike Miclon has raved about David Wilcox’s music for a while now, but he’d never had a chance to see the North Carolina resident live. Mike discovered David Wilcox years ago on NPR during an episode of Car Talk that played David Wilcox’s tune, “Rusty Old American Dream.” Mike was hooked. He bought David’s complete musical collection and was really excited to see him live for the first time. His energy got me pumped for the show. Also, Mike had made a mix CD of music of people who are performing at Johnson Hall this season, and I kept skipping back to play David Wilcox’s “Language Of The Heart.” It’s beautiful. His live show, however, was far from it.

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Every so often, you’re really excited for a show and it falls completely flat. Sometimes people are better on record, which is a big disappointment for those of us who love to see music performed live. David’s live show left a lot to be desired. He was overly effusive and a little odd during his song introductions and I had an impossible time connecting with him and enjoying his protracted stories. At least, then, I’d hoped to enjoy his songs, but I found them unappealing—to the point that I left at intermission, which I really almost never do. I would be interested to know if David Wilcox has a strong live show following and, if so, what folks who enjoy him live see in him. I sure missed it, but I’m glad I was there just in case! You never know!

xo,

bree

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Gardiner’s 6th Annual Swine & Stein Oktoberfest

Saturday, October 10, 2015

Water Street, Downtown Gardiner, Maine

I’ve lived in Gardiner for over nine years now and have come to love my sweet little town and am proud to call this fabulous place home. Gardiner continues to grow, and much of that energy and progress has to do with the efforts of Gardiner Main Street. One of my favorite annual events, sponsored by the dedicated folks at Gardiner Main Street, is our Swine & Stein Oktoberfest. It combines Maine beer, Maine pork, and live music from Maine artists. Where else can you get all those things and a beard and mustache competition, a frozen t shirt contest, a rubber chicken toss, AND a rock-paper-scissors competition?! Swine & Stein is always a great day, and this year—the 6th annual—was no different.

Gardiner's 6th Annual Swine & Stein Oktoberfest

Gardiner’s 6th Annual Swine & Stein Oktoberfest

I was thrilled to be asked back as a local judge for the second annual Swine & Stein Beard and Mustache Competition, sponsored by Monkitree. Mike Miclon, Executive Artistic Director of Johnson Hall, called it a “dog show, but with less touching.” It’s such good fun.

The impressive winners of the Second Annual Swine & Stein Beard and Mustache Competition

The impressive winners of the Second Annual Swine & Stein Beard and Mustache Competition

Sometimes, the bearded and mustachioed must dance!

Sometimes, the bearded and mustachioed must dance!

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Bronwyn took home the 4th Annual Rock-Paper-Scissors Competition!

Bronwyn took home the 4th Annual Rock-Paper-Scissors Competition!

We were treated to talented musical acts on the main stage all day—Emilia Dahlin, the Oktoberfest German Band, Muddy Ruckus, The Pete Kilpatrick Band, and The Colwell Brothers. A couple of new things this year—the “Beer U” tent hosted by Craft Beer Celler (opening very soon on Water Street in downtown Gardiner) and a butchering demonstration by Emery’s Meat and Produce that was quite well attended. I don’t eat pork because I think pigs are wicked cute, but I dropped by the butchering demonstration and it was fascinating.

Emilia Dahlin

Emilia Dahlin

The Pete Kilpatrick Band

The Pete Kilpatrick Band

Thanks to everyone who worked so hard to make Swine & Stein a great day! Gardiner Main Street—you rock! I had the pleasure of introducing The Colwell Brothers to the main stage for their set, and I mentioned to the crowd that we love having everyone visit Gardiner for Swine & Stein, but that we are also here and open for business all the time! Come back and visit us soon! And, of course, we’ll see you next year at Swine & Stein! I took lots more photos, so please check them out below. If you’d like to use one somehow, please give photo credit to Bree Candland of whatbreesees.com. Thank you!

xo,

bree

Swine & Stein is a kid-friendly event

Swine & Stein is a kid-friendly event

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So many Gardiner Main Street volunteers on the scene! Thanks, All!

So many Gardiner Main Street volunteers on the scene! Thanks, All!

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Giant jenga was a bit hit!

Giant jenga was a bit hit!

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All of the Beard & Mustache Competition entrants!

All of the Beard & Mustache Competition entrants!

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The Oktoberfest German Band

The Oktoberfest German Band

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Mike Miclon of Johnson Hall with Clare Marron of Monkitree

Mike Miclon of Johnson Hall with Clare Marron of Monkitree

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Muddy Ruckus

Muddy Ruckus

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Butchering demonstration

Butchering demonstration

Rock-paper-scissors preliminary rounds

Rock-paper-scissors preliminary rounds

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The Colwell Brothers

The Colwell Brothers

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